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Started by Miestră Schivă, UrN, January 02, 2022, 03:11:40 PM

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GV

Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 05, 2022, 03:34:08 PM
Quote from: GV on January 05, 2022, 12:28:33 AM
You will probably remember the Kingdom having a 'Mugshots' page, started in 1996.  It may be time for such a thing to make a return?

Yipes no, don't you value your privacy?

Good point.

Tric'hard Lenxheir

I was thinking the same thing LOL
Tric'hard Lenxheir (Senator-TNC)

https://ibb.co/3z5vFjn][/url

GV

Quote from: Tric'hard Lenxheir on January 05, 2022, 07:09:04 PM
I was thinking the same thing LOL

1996 was a different time lol.  A bit of my Talossan mind is still stuck in summer 2000 when I first showed up.  The country really was unrecognizable compared to the better society we have now.

Miestră Schivă, UrN

Okay, by the grace of Allà we have a couple of prospectives in the pipeline. As Interior Minister, and for the purposes of research on this topic, I would like to ask them both: what would you like to know from us about how Talossa works? and if/when you become a citizen, what would you like to do first?

PROTECT THE ORGLAW FROM POWER GRABS - NO POLITICISED KING! Vote THE FREE DEMOCRATS OF TALOSSA
¡LADINTSCHIÇETZ-VOI - rogetz-mhe cacsa!
"IS INACTIVITY BAD? I THINK NOT!" - Lord Hooligan

GV

Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 06, 2022, 01:40:48 PM
Okay, by the grace of Allà we have a couple of prospectives in the pipeline. As Interior Minister, and for the purposes of research on this topic, I would like to ask them both: what would you like to know from us about how Talossa works? and if/when you become a citizen, what would you like to do first?

Ask them.  Ask them now.  Shall I ask them?

Mic’haglh Autófil, SMC MC EiP

Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 06, 2022, 01:40:48 PM
Okay, by the grace of Allà we have a couple of prospectives in the pipeline. As Interior Minister, and for the purposes of research on this topic, I would like to ask them both: what would you like to know from us about how Talossa works? and if/when you become a citizen, what would you like to do first?
How exactly do seats get divvied up in the Cosa? Like...I see people with multiple seats, and that just doesn't compute (though I have been following legislative discussions and that's one reason I'm a fan of the Direct Cosa, lol)

What I want to do first? Apply for a spot with the RTCOA, especially if they lack a vexillology department.
The Long Fellow, Royal Talossan College of Arms
Specialist, Els Zuávs da l'Altahál Rexhitál
Cäps Naziunal, Parti da Reformaziun

Miestră Schivă, UrN

Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 02:40:16 PM
How exactly do seats get divvied up in the Cosa? Like...I see people with multiple seats, and that just doesn't compute (though I have been following legislative discussions and that's one reason I'm a fan of the Direct Cosa, lol)

Okay: the Cosa is a strict proportional representation system, right? So, 200 seats, party X wins 15 percent of the vote, they get 30 seats.

After that, within a few special rules, parties can give any number of seats to whomever they like with a few restrictions:

- they can't give more than 1/3 of their seats to people who weren't on their list of candidates;
- there's a maximum number of seats any individual is allowed to hold which depends on total turnout (right now I believe that maximum is 28).

I should point out that these restrictions are relatively recent. In the 1980s, a party leader who won an absolute majority of seats could hold all those seats himself and basically thus be the Cosa all by himself. And when that person was the King, it meant rule by decree. I'm serious, if you'll read the old histories, King Robert I would "convene the Cosa" by himself in his bedroom and announce new laws to the masses in his next newsletter.

After that change, it was a struggle to implement party lists. Before those were implemented, parties could give seats to whomever; meaning not only did the voters have zero control over who got a vote in the Cosa, but there was a tradition whereby the ruling party recruited new citizens "fresh off the boat" by giving them Cosa seats. Talk about a self-perpetuating oligarchy.

This whole system is one of those botch-job compromises which only exist because of a stalemate between reformists and traditionalists. Any other questions?

PROTECT THE ORGLAW FROM POWER GRABS - NO POLITICISED KING! Vote THE FREE DEMOCRATS OF TALOSSA
¡LADINTSCHIÇETZ-VOI - rogetz-mhe cacsa!
"IS INACTIVITY BAD? I THINK NOT!" - Lord Hooligan

Mic’haglh Autófil, SMC MC EiP

Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 06, 2022, 03:34:50 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 02:40:16 PM
How exactly do seats get divvied up in the Cosa? Like...I see people with multiple seats, and that just doesn't compute (though I have been following legislative discussions and that's one reason I'm a fan of the Direct Cosa, lol)

Okay: the Cosa is a strict proportional representation system, right? So, 200 seats, party X wins 15 percent of the vote, they get 30 seats.

After that, within a few special rules, parties can give any number of seats to whomever they like with a few restrictions:

- they can't give more than 1/3 of their seats to people who weren't on their list of candidates;
- there's a maximum number of seats any individual is allowed to hold which depends on total turnout (right now I believe that maximum is 28).

I should point out that these restrictions are relatively recent. In the 1980s, a party leader who won an absolute majority of seats could hold all those seats himself and basically thus be the Cosa all by himself. And when that person was the King, it meant rule by decree. I'm serious, if you'll read the old histories, King Robert I would "convene the Cosa" by himself in his bedroom and announce new laws to the masses in his next newsletter.

After that change, it was a struggle to implement party lists. Before those were implemented, parties could give seats to whomever; meaning not only did the voters have zero control over who got a vote in the Cosa, but there was a tradition whereby the ruling party recruited new citizens "fresh off the boat" by giving them Cosa seats. Talk about a self-perpetuating oligarchy.

This whole system is one of those botch-job compromises which only exist because of a stalemate between reformists and traditionalists. Any other questions?
I knew it was PR, the rest of the info was more what I was looking for. Thank you!

Other questions...I see there's been discussion on the monarchy and activity and whatnot. Would you say Talossa has a fairly notable republican current?
The Long Fellow, Royal Talossan College of Arms
Specialist, Els Zuávs da l'Altahál Rexhitál
Cäps Naziunal, Parti da Reformaziun

Baron Alexandreu Davinescu

I was a long time opponent of the mandatory party lists, and I still am. I think that the ability to give a small number of seats new immigrants did a lot to get them involved and make them feel like they had some real responsibility. I understand the arguments against, but I think it's really hard to look at our current situation and argue that the change has prevented an oligopoly. We currently have such a thorough oligopoly that Miestra there tried to semi-retire, but has had to be the real Seneschal for like six months now. Meanwhile, it's becoming increasingly difficult to make new immigrants feel like they have any real stake in their new country... so there's broad agreement on a new proposal to once again begin giving seats to new immigrants!

One thing I do like about the new proposal, though, is that the seats will be non-partisan in nature. That should help make both factions happy with the practice.
Alexandreu Davinescu, Baron Davinescu del Vilatx Freiric del Vilatx Freiric es Guaír del Sabor Talossan


Bitter struggles deform their participants in subtle, complicated ways. ― Zadie Smith
Revolution is an art that I pursue rather than a goal I expect to achieve. ― Robert Heinlein

Baron Alexandreu Davinescu

#24
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 03:58:55 PM
Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 06, 2022, 03:34:50 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 02:40:16 PM
How exactly do seats get divvied up in the Cosa? Like...I see people with multiple seats, and that just doesn't compute (though I have been following legislative discussions and that's one reason I'm a fan of the Direct Cosa, lol)

Okay: the Cosa is a strict proportional representation system, right? So, 200 seats, party X wins 15 percent of the vote, they get 30 seats.

After that, within a few special rules, parties can give any number of seats to whomever they like with a few restrictions:

- they can't give more than 1/3 of their seats to people who weren't on their list of candidates;
- there's a maximum number of seats any individual is allowed to hold which depends on total turnout (right now I believe that maximum is 28).

I should point out that these restrictions are relatively recent. In the 1980s, a party leader who won an absolute majority of seats could hold all those seats himself and basically thus be the Cosa all by himself. And when that person was the King, it meant rule by decree. I'm serious, if you'll read the old histories, King Robert I would "convene the Cosa" by himself in his bedroom and announce new laws to the masses in his next newsletter.

After that change, it was a struggle to implement party lists. Before those were implemented, parties could give seats to whomever; meaning not only did the voters have zero control over who got a vote in the Cosa, but there was a tradition whereby the ruling party recruited new citizens "fresh off the boat" by giving them Cosa seats. Talk about a self-perpetuating oligarchy.

This whole system is one of those botch-job compromises which only exist because of a stalemate between reformists and traditionalists. Any other questions?
I knew it was PR, the rest of the info was more what I was looking for. Thank you!

Other questions...I see there's been discussion on the monarchy and activity and whatnot. Would you say Talossa has a fairly notable republican current?

Miestra herself is one of the longtime proponents of a republic, and there actually was a Republic of Talossa for many years. It formed when something like half of all active citizens grew outraged over the behavior of the then-king, Robert I. For a long time, there were two Talossas. Eventually, however, the two countries merged back together again. In recognition of their longtime cultural identity and contributions, a new province was created from voluntary cessions of existing provinces to make Fiova, and this process was considered to be a merger of equals. In the years since, some of these citizens and other new ones have continued the pursuit of a new Republic. There has actually been considerable effort just recently along those lines, with a proposal for a regularly elected president (The office would still be called "king," though, and would still have the same powers for now, so proponents of the change argue that this means it would basically be the same monarchy. I disagree, but it's a live argument and their perspective will be different.)

It remains to be seen what's going to happen in the future! If you immigrate, you can be a part of helping decide our future!
Alexandreu Davinescu, Baron Davinescu del Vilatx Freiric del Vilatx Freiric es Guaír del Sabor Talossan


Bitter struggles deform their participants in subtle, complicated ways. ― Zadie Smith
Revolution is an art that I pursue rather than a goal I expect to achieve. ― Robert Heinlein

Mic’haglh Autófil, SMC MC EiP

Quote from: Baron Alexandreu Davinescu on January 06, 2022, 04:24:23 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 03:58:55 PM
Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 06, 2022, 03:34:50 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 02:40:16 PM
How exactly do seats get divvied up in the Cosa? Like...I see people with multiple seats, and that just doesn't compute (though I have been following legislative discussions and that's one reason I'm a fan of the Direct Cosa, lol)

Okay: the Cosa is a strict proportional representation system, right? So, 200 seats, party X wins 15 percent of the vote, they get 30 seats.

After that, within a few special rules, parties can give any number of seats to whomever they like with a few restrictions:

- they can't give more than 1/3 of their seats to people who weren't on their list of candidates;
- there's a maximum number of seats any individual is allowed to hold which depends on total turnout (right now I believe that maximum is 28).

I should point out that these restrictions are relatively recent. In the 1980s, a party leader who won an absolute majority of seats could hold all those seats himself and basically thus be the Cosa all by himself. And when that person was the King, it meant rule by decree. I'm serious, if you'll read the old histories, King Robert I would "convene the Cosa" by himself in his bedroom and announce new laws to the masses in his next newsletter.

After that change, it was a struggle to implement party lists. Before those were implemented, parties could give seats to whomever; meaning not only did the voters have zero control over who got a vote in the Cosa, but there was a tradition whereby the ruling party recruited new citizens "fresh off the boat" by giving them Cosa seats. Talk about a self-perpetuating oligarchy.

This whole system is one of those botch-job compromises which only exist because of a stalemate between reformists and traditionalists. Any other questions?
I knew it was PR, the rest of the info was more what I was looking for. Thank you!

Other questions...I see there's been discussion on the monarchy and activity and whatnot. Would you say Talossa has a fairly notable republican current?

Miestra herself is one of the longtime proponents of a republic, and there actually was a Republic of Talossa for many years. It formed when something like half of all active citizens grew outraged over the behavior of the then-king, Robert I. For a long time, there were two Talossas. Eventually, however, the two countries merged back together again. In recognition of their longtime cultural identity and contributions, a new province was created from voluntary cessions of existing provinces to make Fiova, and this process was considered to be a merger of equals. In the years since, some of these citizens and other new ones have continued the pursuit of a new Republic. There has actually been considerable effort just recently along those lines, with a proposal for a regularly elected president (The office would still be called "king," though, and would still have the same powers for now, so proponents of the change argue that this means it would basically be the same monarchy. I disagree, but it's a live argument and their perspective will be different.)

It remains to be seen what's going to happen in the future! If you immigrate, you can be a part of helping decide our future!
I did know of the Republic's existence — I've actually been trying to figure out for a week now how I think "Reunision" is properly pronounced, haha

Not that I'm a citizen yet, of course — and bearing in mind I would stand to benefit from such a change — but I think the idea of some Cosa seats for new citizens is a good one.

As far as the executive goes, I'll admit I've long thought of a directory as a good form of republic, but that's just my opinion.
The Long Fellow, Royal Talossan College of Arms
Specialist, Els Zuávs da l'Altahál Rexhitál
Cäps Naziunal, Parti da Reformaziun

Baron Alexandreu Davinescu

Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 05:41:22 PM
Quote from: Baron Alexandreu Davinescu on January 06, 2022, 04:24:23 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 03:58:55 PM
Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 06, 2022, 03:34:50 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 02:40:16 PM
How exactly do seats get divvied up in the Cosa? Like...I see people with multiple seats, and that just doesn't compute (though I have been following legislative discussions and that's one reason I'm a fan of the Direct Cosa, lol)

Okay: the Cosa is a strict proportional representation system, right? So, 200 seats, party X wins 15 percent of the vote, they get 30 seats.

After that, within a few special rules, parties can give any number of seats to whomever they like with a few restrictions:

- they can't give more than 1/3 of their seats to people who weren't on their list of candidates;
- there's a maximum number of seats any individual is allowed to hold which depends on total turnout (right now I believe that maximum is 28).

I should point out that these restrictions are relatively recent. In the 1980s, a party leader who won an absolute majority of seats could hold all those seats himself and basically thus be the Cosa all by himself. And when that person was the King, it meant rule by decree. I'm serious, if you'll read the old histories, King Robert I would "convene the Cosa" by himself in his bedroom and announce new laws to the masses in his next newsletter.

After that change, it was a struggle to implement party lists. Before those were implemented, parties could give seats to whomever; meaning not only did the voters have zero control over who got a vote in the Cosa, but there was a tradition whereby the ruling party recruited new citizens "fresh off the boat" by giving them Cosa seats. Talk about a self-perpetuating oligarchy.

This whole system is one of those botch-job compromises which only exist because of a stalemate between reformists and traditionalists. Any other questions?
I knew it was PR, the rest of the info was more what I was looking for. Thank you!

Other questions...I see there's been discussion on the monarchy and activity and whatnot. Would you say Talossa has a fairly notable republican current?

Miestra herself is one of the longtime proponents of a republic, and there actually was a Republic of Talossa for many years. It formed when something like half of all active citizens grew outraged over the behavior of the then-king, Robert I. For a long time, there were two Talossas. Eventually, however, the two countries merged back together again. In recognition of their longtime cultural identity and contributions, a new province was created from voluntary cessions of existing provinces to make Fiova, and this process was considered to be a merger of equals. In the years since, some of these citizens and other new ones have continued the pursuit of a new Republic. There has actually been considerable effort just recently along those lines, with a proposal for a regularly elected president (The office would still be called "king," though, and would still have the same powers for now, so proponents of the change argue that this means it would basically be the same monarchy. I disagree, but it's a live argument and their perspective will be different.)

It remains to be seen what's going to happen in the future! If you immigrate, you can be a part of helping decide our future!
I did know of the Republic's existence — I've actually been trying to figure out for a week now how I think "Reunision" is properly pronounced, haha

Not that I'm a citizen yet, of course — and bearing in mind I would stand to benefit from such a change — but I think the idea of some Cosa seats for new citizens is a good one.

As far as the executive goes, I'll admit I've long thought of a directory as a good form of republic, but that's just my opinion.

Like so many things, Reunision started off as a typo. But it's one of the quirks of our country that people will often joyfully seize on small mistakes like that and turn them into traditions!

What do you mean when you speak about a directorate? Do you mean like the thing they had in revolutionary France? I don't know enough about political science to be sure I'm getting the reference.
Alexandreu Davinescu, Baron Davinescu del Vilatx Freiric del Vilatx Freiric es Guaír del Sabor Talossan


Bitter struggles deform their participants in subtle, complicated ways. ― Zadie Smith
Revolution is an art that I pursue rather than a goal I expect to achieve. ― Robert Heinlein

Mic’haglh Autófil, SMC MC EiP

Quote from: Baron Alexandreu Davinescu on January 06, 2022, 05:50:07 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 05:41:22 PM
Quote from: Baron Alexandreu Davinescu on January 06, 2022, 04:24:23 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 03:58:55 PM
Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 06, 2022, 03:34:50 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 02:40:16 PM
How exactly do seats get divvied up in the Cosa? Like...I see people with multiple seats, and that just doesn't compute (though I have been following legislative discussions and that's one reason I'm a fan of the Direct Cosa, lol)

Okay: the Cosa is a strict proportional representation system, right? So, 200 seats, party X wins 15 percent of the vote, they get 30 seats.

After that, within a few special rules, parties can give any number of seats to whomever they like with a few restrictions:

- they can't give more than 1/3 of their seats to people who weren't on their list of candidates;
- there's a maximum number of seats any individual is allowed to hold which depends on total turnout (right now I believe that maximum is 28).

I should point out that these restrictions are relatively recent. In the 1980s, a party leader who won an absolute majority of seats could hold all those seats himself and basically thus be the Cosa all by himself. And when that person was the King, it meant rule by decree. I'm serious, if you'll read the old histories, King Robert I would "convene the Cosa" by himself in his bedroom and announce new laws to the masses in his next newsletter.

After that change, it was a struggle to implement party lists. Before those were implemented, parties could give seats to whomever; meaning not only did the voters have zero control over who got a vote in the Cosa, but there was a tradition whereby the ruling party recruited new citizens "fresh off the boat" by giving them Cosa seats. Talk about a self-perpetuating oligarchy.

This whole system is one of those botch-job compromises which only exist because of a stalemate between reformists and traditionalists. Any other questions?
I knew it was PR, the rest of the info was more what I was looking for. Thank you!

Other questions...I see there's been discussion on the monarchy and activity and whatnot. Would you say Talossa has a fairly notable republican current?

Miestra herself is one of the longtime proponents of a republic, and there actually was a Republic of Talossa for many years. It formed when something like half of all active citizens grew outraged over the behavior of the then-king, Robert I. For a long time, there were two Talossas. Eventually, however, the two countries merged back together again. In recognition of their longtime cultural identity and contributions, a new province was created from voluntary cessions of existing provinces to make Fiova, and this process was considered to be a merger of equals. In the years since, some of these citizens and other new ones have continued the pursuit of a new Republic. There has actually been considerable effort just recently along those lines, with a proposal for a regularly elected president (The office would still be called "king," though, and would still have the same powers for now, so proponents of the change argue that this means it would basically be the same monarchy. I disagree, but it's a live argument and their perspective will be different.)

It remains to be seen what's going to happen in the future! If you immigrate, you can be a part of helping decide our future!
I did know of the Republic's existence — I've actually been trying to figure out for a week now how I think "Reunision" is properly pronounced, haha

Not that I'm a citizen yet, of course — and bearing in mind I would stand to benefit from such a change — but I think the idea of some Cosa seats for new citizens is a good one.

As far as the executive goes, I'll admit I've long thought of a directory as a good form of republic, but that's just my opinion.

Like so many things, Reunision started off as a typo. But it's one of the quirks of our country that people will often joyfully seize on small mistakes like that and turn them into traditions!

What do you mean when you speak about a directorate? Do you mean like the thing they had in revolutionary France? I don't know enough about political science to be sure I'm getting the reference.
That is actually where they get the name! A good current example is Switzerland. Their seven-member Federal Council serves as a collective Head of State and a Cabinet.
The Long Fellow, Royal Talossan College of Arms
Specialist, Els Zuávs da l'Altahál Rexhitál
Cäps Naziunal, Parti da Reformaziun

Baron Alexandreu Davinescu

Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 05:53:12 PM
Quote from: Baron Alexandreu Davinescu on January 06, 2022, 05:50:07 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 05:41:22 PM
Quote from: Baron Alexandreu Davinescu on January 06, 2022, 04:24:23 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 03:58:55 PM
Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 06, 2022, 03:34:50 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 02:40:16 PM
How exactly do seats get divvied up in the Cosa? Like...I see people with multiple seats, and that just doesn't compute (though I have been following legislative discussions and that's one reason I'm a fan of the Direct Cosa, lol)

Okay: the Cosa is a strict proportional representation system, right? So, 200 seats, party X wins 15 percent of the vote, they get 30 seats.

After that, within a few special rules, parties can give any number of seats to whomever they like with a few restrictions:

- they can't give more than 1/3 of their seats to people who weren't on their list of candidates;
- there's a maximum number of seats any individual is allowed to hold which depends on total turnout (right now I believe that maximum is 28).

I should point out that these restrictions are relatively recent. In the 1980s, a party leader who won an absolute majority of seats could hold all those seats himself and basically thus be the Cosa all by himself. And when that person was the King, it meant rule by decree. I'm serious, if you'll read the old histories, King Robert I would "convene the Cosa" by himself in his bedroom and announce new laws to the masses in his next newsletter.

After that change, it was a struggle to implement party lists. Before those were implemented, parties could give seats to whomever; meaning not only did the voters have zero control over who got a vote in the Cosa, but there was a tradition whereby the ruling party recruited new citizens "fresh off the boat" by giving them Cosa seats. Talk about a self-perpetuating oligarchy.

This whole system is one of those botch-job compromises which only exist because of a stalemate between reformists and traditionalists. Any other questions?
I knew it was PR, the rest of the info was more what I was looking for. Thank you!

Other questions...I see there's been discussion on the monarchy and activity and whatnot. Would you say Talossa has a fairly notable republican current?

Miestra herself is one of the longtime proponents of a republic, and there actually was a Republic of Talossa for many years. It formed when something like half of all active citizens grew outraged over the behavior of the then-king, Robert I. For a long time, there were two Talossas. Eventually, however, the two countries merged back together again. In recognition of their longtime cultural identity and contributions, a new province was created from voluntary cessions of existing provinces to make Fiova, and this process was considered to be a merger of equals. In the years since, some of these citizens and other new ones have continued the pursuit of a new Republic. There has actually been considerable effort just recently along those lines, with a proposal for a regularly elected president (The office would still be called "king," though, and would still have the same powers for now, so proponents of the change argue that this means it would basically be the same monarchy. I disagree, but it's a live argument and their perspective will be different.)

It remains to be seen what's going to happen in the future! If you immigrate, you can be a part of helping decide our future!
I did know of the Republic's existence — I've actually been trying to figure out for a week now how I think "Reunision" is properly pronounced, haha

Not that I'm a citizen yet, of course — and bearing in mind I would stand to benefit from such a change — but I think the idea of some Cosa seats for new citizens is a good one.

As far as the executive goes, I'll admit I've long thought of a directory as a good form of republic, but that's just my opinion.

Like so many things, Reunision started off as a typo. But it's one of the quirks of our country that people will often joyfully seize on small mistakes like that and turn them into traditions!

What do you mean when you speak about a directorate? Do you mean like the thing they had in revolutionary France? I don't know enough about political science to be sure I'm getting the reference.
That is actually where they get the name! A good current example is Switzerland. Their seven-member Federal Council serves as a collective Head of State and a Cabinet.

The Republic of Talossa had more of a French model, maybe. They had a parliamentary government with a president. I think that's what they have in France, anyway.

Some of our provinces effectively operate the way you're suggesting, though, with every interested citizen effectively comprising both an executive and legislative body. I don't think that there are any with a fixed number of members, though.

Alexandreu Davinescu, Baron Davinescu del Vilatx Freiric del Vilatx Freiric es Guaír del Sabor Talossan


Bitter struggles deform their participants in subtle, complicated ways. ― Zadie Smith
Revolution is an art that I pursue rather than a goal I expect to achieve. ― Robert Heinlein

Ian Plätschisch

Quote from: Baron Alexandreu Davinescu on January 06, 2022, 06:05:50 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 05:53:12 PM
Quote from: Baron Alexandreu Davinescu on January 06, 2022, 05:50:07 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 05:41:22 PM
Quote from: Baron Alexandreu Davinescu on January 06, 2022, 04:24:23 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 03:58:55 PM
Quote from: Miestră Schivă, UrN on January 06, 2022, 03:34:50 PM
Quote from: Mic'haglh Autófil on January 06, 2022, 02:40:16 PM
How exactly do seats get divvied up in the Cosa? Like...I see people with multiple seats, and that just doesn't compute (though I have been following legislative discussions and that's one reason I'm a fan of the Direct Cosa, lol)

Okay: the Cosa is a strict proportional representation system, right? So, 200 seats, party X wins 15 percent of the vote, they get 30 seats.

After that, within a few special rules, parties can give any number of seats to whomever they like with a few restrictions:

- they can't give more than 1/3 of their seats to people who weren't on their list of candidates;
- there's a maximum number of seats any individual is allowed to hold which depends on total turnout (right now I believe that maximum is 28).

I should point out that these restrictions are relatively recent. In the 1980s, a party leader who won an absolute majority of seats could hold all those seats himself and basically thus be the Cosa all by himself. And when that person was the King, it meant rule by decree. I'm serious, if you'll read the old histories, King Robert I would "convene the Cosa" by himself in his bedroom and announce new laws to the masses in his next newsletter.

After that change, it was a struggle to implement party lists. Before those were implemented, parties could give seats to whomever; meaning not only did the voters have zero control over who got a vote in the Cosa, but there was a tradition whereby the ruling party recruited new citizens "fresh off the boat" by giving them Cosa seats. Talk about a self-perpetuating oligarchy.

This whole system is one of those botch-job compromises which only exist because of a stalemate between reformists and traditionalists. Any other questions?
I knew it was PR, the rest of the info was more what I was looking for. Thank you!

Other questions...I see there's been discussion on the monarchy and activity and whatnot. Would you say Talossa has a fairly notable republican current?

Miestra herself is one of the longtime proponents of a republic, and there actually was a Republic of Talossa for many years. It formed when something like half of all active citizens grew outraged over the behavior of the then-king, Robert I. For a long time, there were two Talossas. Eventually, however, the two countries merged back together again. In recognition of their longtime cultural identity and contributions, a new province was created from voluntary cessions of existing provinces to make Fiova, and this process was considered to be a merger of equals. In the years since, some of these citizens and other new ones have continued the pursuit of a new Republic. There has actually been considerable effort just recently along those lines, with a proposal for a regularly elected president (The office would still be called "king," though, and would still have the same powers for now, so proponents of the change argue that this means it would basically be the same monarchy. I disagree, but it's a live argument and their perspective will be different.)

It remains to be seen what's going to happen in the future! If you immigrate, you can be a part of helping decide our future!
I did know of the Republic's existence — I've actually been trying to figure out for a week now how I think "Reunision" is properly pronounced, haha

Not that I'm a citizen yet, of course — and bearing in mind I would stand to benefit from such a change — but I think the idea of some Cosa seats for new citizens is a good one.

As far as the executive goes, I'll admit I've long thought of a directory as a good form of republic, but that's just my opinion.

Like so many things, Reunision started off as a typo. But it's one of the quirks of our country that people will often joyfully seize on small mistakes like that and turn them into traditions!

What do you mean when you speak about a directorate? Do you mean like the thing they had in revolutionary France? I don't know enough about political science to be sure I'm getting the reference.
That is actually where they get the name! A good current example is Switzerland. Their seven-member Federal Council serves as a collective Head of State and a Cabinet.

The Republic of Talossa had more of a French model, maybe. They had a parliamentary government with a president. I think that's what they have in France, anyway.

Some of our provinces effectively operate the way you're suggesting, though, with every interested citizen effectively comprising both an executive and legislative body. I don't think that there are any with a fixed number of members, though.
Can we change the settings so that the number of quoted messages is limited by default, like it was on ProBoards? This is getting out of hand.